Oral care and aspiration pneumonia

7 posts

DRS Digest 2017: news from the March 1-4, 2017 annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society. Held in Portland, OR.

DRS Digest 2017: Raising Awareness through Research

Dysphagia Digest 2017: Raising Awareness regarding Swallowing Disorders & Treatment There was not much time to sample Portland, Oregon’s craft beers or Portland’s famous Salt & Straw ice cream, because the over 500 attendees at the Dysphagia Research Society‘s annual meeting were in stimulating sessions from March 1-4, 2017. DRS is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, so give DRS a big “cheers” with your craft beer now, and read on! The mayor of the […]

saliva "bubble" with puzzle pieces in it to represent the complexity of saliva. Much is still unknown.

Saliva Puzzle: Saliva Production & Swallowing

The Saliva Puzzle: Saliva Production & Its Influence on Swallowing Guest Authors: Joanne Yee, MS, CF-SLP & Nicole Rogus-Pulia, PhD., CCC-SLP Editor: Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S of SwallowStudy.com  Aspiration pneumonia (AP) is one of the leading causes of death among older adults, ranking among the top 10 most common diagnoses leading to in-hospital mortality in a recent study.1 The presence of oropharyngeal dysphagia is widely considered one of the most important risk factors for […]

Some people with head and neck cancer who are undergoing radiation feel that the taste of strawberry is better preserved.

8 Tips for Survivors of Head and Neck Cancer

8 Swallowing Tips for Survivors of Head and Neck Cancer by Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S of SwallowStudy.com Speech-Language Pathologists provide “life-altering” evaluations and treatments, according to The American Speech & Hearing Association (ASHA) in their promotion of May is Better Hearing & Speech Month (BHSM). ASHA raises awareness about the difficulties people of all ages have with hearing, communicating, and feeding/eating/swallowing. When I hear “life-altering,” I especially think about the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. […]

Picture of a dolphin laying back allowing a human to brush his teeth with an electric toothbrush.

How To Perform Effective Oral Care (Part IV)

How to Perform Effective Oral Care for Aspiration Pneumonia Prevention by Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, at SwallowStudy.com Only 16% of nurses reported that they brush a patient’s teeth every 4 hours, and 33% reported brushing “rarely or not at all” (Cason, et al, 2007). However, this dolphin is receiving good oral care with an electric toothbrush!   We have explored the many reasons WHY the mouths of critically ill patients need good oral care […]

Picture of rod-shaped Escherichia Coli Bacteria. Commonly found in the lower intestines. However, pathogenic strains take the fecal->oral route of transmission to cause disease.

Take a Trip to the Lungs with 12 Bacterial Species (Part III: Oral Hygiene)

Part III of Oral Hygiene and Aspiration Pneumonia Prevention. By Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S As we are coming and going from our summer vacations, consider the travels that bacteria may take around the body. The germs in the mouth are the same germs that travel to the lungs to cause pneumonia, according to Shay (2014). These bacteria can be found in the hospital or nursing facility environment, on the staff and visitors, and on […]

The changes in soil composition and pH after a volcanic eruption may be analogous to changes in an oral microbiome or ecosystem after illness and infection.

What Do Volcanoes & Mouths Have in Common? (Part II: Oral Microbiome & Saliva)

Part II of Oral Microbiome and Saliva By Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S. SwallowStudy.com I was out in the beautiful pacific northwest the summer of 2014, learning about the region’s flora, fauna, volcanos and glaciers. Especially interesting was visiting Mount Saint Helens in Washington state. After 34 years, the destructive power of the 1980 volcanic eruption is still evident. However, this ecosystem or ecobiome is recovering. The ash-filled pumice plain is finally being recolonized. My […]

Oral Care and Aspiration Pneumonia Prevention

10 Trillion Microorganisms vs Your Toothbrush (Part I: Oral Hygiene)

This blog was inspired by the presentation: “Dental Perspectives on Aspiration Pneumonia Causes and Management” by Kennneth Shay, DDS, MS Dentist and Gerontologist Department of Veterans Affairs: Office of Geriatrics and Extended Care ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute April 12, 2014 “The mouth is dirty,” Dr Kenneth Shay stated frankly at the ASHA Institute, and it’s “the biggest hole in your body!” Warning: You may want to finish eating, brush your teeth, floss, use mouthwash, […]